Ocean Shores Blog

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Float your way eerily down the way to the Copalis Ghost Forest

By Cindy Stearns
Published: 10/28/19 Topics: Comments: -

Eerie and hidden from view is the Copalis Ghost Forest. Travel the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway. When an earthquake hit in January 26, 1700, the ocean flooded the forest and thus, the Copalis Ghost Forest was created.

Known among researches as "the best example of a ghost forest in the world" this 9.0+ earthquake along the Cascadia subduction zone lowered the level of the land. Today, 300-foot high dead spruce trees still stand along the river banks.

Native Americans and First Nations people carried the story of this storm through oral tradition.This expansive grove of ghostly red cedars, geologists Brian Atwater and David Yamaguchi discovered, was killed by a deluge of salt water.

Kwakwaka’wakw indigenous group of British Columbia along with the Japanese have been able to determine the date this ghost forest formed. The date of the tsunami is calculated via tree ring data and records in Japan where they have tracked every tsunami wave for centuries.

In Japan, a six foot wave shortly after this earthquake was recorded.

The ghost forest may only be reached by boat. It's about two miles inland from Copalis Beach.

Local expert, Buck Giles of Buck's Bikes is able to provide you with more detail and access to this ghost forest. "The Copalis River Ghost Forest is a treasure trove of natural and local history. It tells a detailed story of the power of mother nature, and shows the signs of early industry and mans attempt to gain from her resources," he said.

Copalis Ghost Forest is accessible by kayak, canoe and even paddle board, according to Giles. He conducts guided tours. Buck's Bikes is in Seabrook on the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway.

Take time for this "ghostly" visit.

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Author: Cindy Stearns
Blog #: 0706 – 10/28/19

Hunting for haunted spots along the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway

By Cindy Stearns
Published: 10/21/19 Topics: Comments: -

October is a scary month. The weather is changing, evening comes quicker and ghosts and goblins roam the streets looking for treats. You're heading to the coast and would like to go with the theme.

Here are some "haunted spots" along the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway:

Billy's Bar and Grill-Billy Gohl may be the most ominous Aberdeen history. An infamous serial killer from the early 1900s, he was a sailor and laborer. As a representative of the Sailor's Union of the Pacific, sailors would stop in his office to collect mail, connect with fellow sailors and deposit their valuables. Initially, Gohl began to steal from his fellow sailors. He graduated to poisioning, shooting, strangling or bludgeoning and dumping their bodies down a trap door that led to the Wishkah River. Estimates are between 40 to over 100 met their faith by Gohl's hand. The restaurant names for him has employees and guests reportedly seeing shot glasses flying across the bar, experiencing cold spots throughout the restaurant, and hearing disembodies voices. And watch for apparitions, possible Gohl himself.

Cooney Mansion-This former bed & breakfast, built in 1908, was the home to lumber baron Neil Cooney. Known as "Spruce Cottage" with its finish of Sitka Spruce, Cooney was the manager of the Grays Harbor Commercial Company. Never married, his home included nine bedrooms, seven bathrooms with 8500 square feet. It has been operated as a bed & breakfast. Psychics have visited the manions. One owner brought in Advanced Ghost Hunters of Seattle-Tacoma (A.G.H.O.S.T.). They've reported doors shutting on their own, reading on their electromagnetic fields (EMFs) device detecting naturally occurring electric fields around electronic devices, indicating paranormal activity. And a personal account of seeming to have hair touched and watched in a mirror in one room, another with a cool breeze. Both of the rooms after having he experiences, being told these are two haunted spots. One was the room of the housekeeper or the companion of Cooney.

Lady Washington-Grays Harbor is home to the stat'es tall ship. It's a replica of the first United States ship to visit the Pacific Northwest in 1788. It was the tall ship of Captain Robert Gray, thus the name Grays Harbor. "A Haunted Tour Guide to the Pacific Northwest" by Jefferson Davis, indicates spirits are attracted to the tall ship when it visits older ports. "Historic Ghosts that remain on the docs seem to gravitate toward the tall ship."

Lake Quinault Lodge-Rain drizzles and you're surrounded by old=growth forest at this historic lodge. Employees and guests have reported encounters with a ghost who allegedly haunts this hotel. "Weird Washington" Your Travel Guide to Washington's Local Legends and Best Kept Secrets" indicates Beverly (the ghost) was an employee of the lodge. When a fire burned the lodge down in 1924 (a larger resort was rebuilt in its place two years later), she was scheduled to work. Feeling sick, she still decided to work. Falling asleep at her post, she died in the fire. A two-room suite filling the entire top floor of the resort's boat hose is named after Beverly and is a site of paranormal encounters.

Museum of the North Beach-Paranormal Investigators of Historic America visited the Museum of the North Beach in Moclips. Reports of hauntings drew the Monroe, WA-based team of investigators to the museum in 2010. They indicated to turning up activity on their EMF readers. With a parabolic listening device, some faint voices were picked up during their investigation. Although the identity of these spirits is uncertain, Moclips' history may prove some possibilities. A mill employee hit by a passing train, a blind woman succumbing in a house fire, a fireman and engineer crushed by a falling tree and numerous casualties with passing shiprwrecks. The investigators presented the museum with a "certifiably haunted" certificate.

Polson Museum-Home for the Polson Logging Company and the Polson family, this colonial-style mansion was built in 1924 with a riverfront view. Now the Polson Museum, exhibits include displays of the area sawmills and logging camps. Find a working kitchen, dressing rooms and period clothing. "The Shadowlands" website has listed the museum as being home to spirits including a lady in white and a child in the nursery. The current curator indicates there have been no experiences.

7th Street Theatre-Ranked #2 in Best Haunted Place with pacificnw.cityvoter.com, this is the last remaining atmospheric theatre in the Pacific Northwest. Restored this theatre was built in 1928. Within 7th Street, with the experience of an outdoor Spanish garden, you may experience something more than the production. Volunteers have personal stories of something other-world-y with them in the theatre.

Set out on your spooky tour of Grays Harbor. Report in those ghostly finds!

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Author: Cindy Stearns – Editor, Ocean Shores Publishing
Blog #: 0693 – 10/21/19

Glide along the Ocean Shores canals

By Cindy Stearns
Published: 10/14/19 Topics: Comments: -

You're heading to the beach and would like to try something new. You love the pounding surf and waves washing up and over your car...

Wait!

First, be sure to pull your vehicle out of the sand and to dry pavement. Now, get in said vehicle and drive down Point Brown Avenue to OS Boathouse.

Did you know there are nearly 25 miles of inter-connected, created fresh waterways with digging beginning in 1960. As Ocean Shores began, so did the canals. A monstrous electric hydraulic dredge, nicknamed the "Razor Clam" by locals, it would dig through and spit out water. The first canal was actually a water feature along the Ocean Shores Golf Course.

Year-round you have access to get out and enjoy these canals. OS Boathouse has several options including hydrobikes, stand-up paddleboards and kayaks.

Duffy Boats are the ideal answer for all ages, mobility levels and for most weather. Even if it's inclement, these boats are covered and give you a front-row seat to viewing wildlife, residential areas and parks along these rather hidden canals.

According to OS Boathouse, "more than a boat, a Duffy electric boat puts you at the helm of a lifestyle powered by quiet, reliable, sophisticated fun."

Powered by 100% electric, zero emissions, you're able to hire a captain or captain yourself (after a brief safety check). How about taking out a group from work, your family and friends for a birthday party or just to enjoy while you visit Ocean Shores?

Oh, you're not Captain Ahab or The Little Mermaid? These waters are calm. So, it's an easy ride along these canals. You'll even be able to take food aboard and not end up with hot chocolate on you or potato chips strewn throughout the boat. Easy gliding.

Read more about OS Boathouse on oceanshores.com. And tell Steve and Maria, you're ready to step aboard your Duffy Boat!

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Author: Cindy Stearns
Blog #: 0692 – 10/14/19

Diggin' it at the beach

By Cindy Stearns
Published: 10/07/19 Topics: Comments: -

Any way you slice it, razors are tops in the North Beach. That's razor clams. Known for their flavor and amount of edible meat, autumn brings digs for the annual season.

You'll discover these little creatures along the coasts from Alaska to California. THE spot for razor clams is the Washington coast. "Home of the Razor Clam" is Copalis Beach.

In the autumn, you'll get night digs. It's something for all ages to participate and nothing like seeing Fido discover a razor clam.

Be sure to dress warmly for your outdoor outing. To keep your feet dry, wear water-repellent boots. You'll need a clam gun or shovel. Take along a bucket or net to keep those clams in (just to your limit). You'll find Clam Beltz, specially designed in Moclips. Night digs will be best with a lantern or flashlight.

So, now you're ready to get digging.

Try these three identifiers when you go for the razor clam:

Dimple-a simple sand indentation, like an "inny" belly-button.

Doughnut Hole-hole with two-three inches of sand built up like a mountain crater, almost looks like a sand donut.

Keyhole-hourglass shape with neck of clam showing.

How do you dig? These are the types of digging at the beach:

Dry-on sand, generally digger to deep than surf.

Surf-find clams in the surf as waves come in and out.

Do you go "old school" shovel or new-age clam gun? Guns are known to be easier to use in wet to medium wet sand. Shovels give you a better opportunity in beds or the surf.

Razor clams are named this for a reason. They're SHARP! It's recommended to wear cloves and pull clams out whole. This shellfish is known as some of the better eating in the Pacific Northwest including chowder and pan fried. These are not to be eaten raw. Be sure you read up or learn how to clean them before you cook.

Now, you're diggin' it in the North Beach!

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Author: Cindy Stearns
Blog #: 0691 – 10/07/19

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