Ocean Shores Blog

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Ocean Shores Publishing launches Hidden Coast Scenic Byway website

By Simon Berman
Published: 11/18/19 Topics: Comments: -

Ocean Shores Publishing, publishers of OceanShores.com, is pleased to announce the launch of hiddencoastscenicbyway.com, a website celebrating the beauty of Washington State’s coastal byway, State Route 109.

The 41 miles of the Hidden Coast Byway traverses the coastal hills and long, sometimes foggy, beaches of the Pacific coast at the western edge of the Olympic Peninsula. Access to state and national parks abound, as do opportunities to observe pristine wilderness and the unique wildlife of the maritime Pacific Northwest.

Ocean Shores Publishing saw a need to better promote this beautiful region to potential visitors and took up the challenge to build and launch a website in celebration. From the newly launched hiddencoastsscenicbyway.com visitors can learn more about the byway’s route, the towns through which it passes, and opportunities for leisure and lodging.

A robust events calendar and blog supplement this information, helping inform the public of local happenings, festivals, and more. Whether visitors are looking for a quiet beach weekend, or a place from which to explore the stunning wilderness of the Copalis Ghost Forest, Olympic National Park, and Grays Harbor National Wildlife refuge, this new site will keep them well informed.

Ocean Shores Publishing is a leading advocate for tourism on Washington’s Pacific Coast. They are the creators and operators of OceanShores.com, the premiere website for information about this popular tourist town and it’s surrounding environs.

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Author: Simon Berman
Blog #: 0711 – 11/18/19

History melds coastline into military resort

By Cindy Stearns
Published: 11/11/19 Topics: Comments: -

It began as an area inhabited by the Quinault Indian Nation. These people populated the North Beach area including what is now Pacific Beach. Their families hunted sea otters and whales via canoe.

Settlers began to arrive in the 1870s and sea otters were expended because of their prized furs. Clams soon overtook otters as the local primary food supply. Clam digging became so vital and a part of North Beach life, classes at the first school opened in 1900 on the nearby Copalis River, were scheduled according to the tides.

Pacific Beach was known as a cannery and sawmill town. And in 1902, another evolution brought a change to the coast. The Northern Pacific Railway linked this dot on the North Beach to the twin harbor towns of Hoquiam and Aberdeen. Pacific Beach was now a resort destination. With an ocean beach almost two miles long, the Pacific Beach Hotel opened in 1906.

After a fire in 1915, the hotel was rebuilt with 50 rooms and added 25 cabins by 1930. During its peak, there were well-known guests including the actor, Frederick Marsh. It became known as one of the Pacific Northwest's idyllic honeymoon destinations.

By 1942, hotel business had declined, due to wartime travel and fuel limitations. The hotel was identified as underused facility that could be quickly transformed to barracks. The Navy purchased the hotel and grounds for use as an anti-aircraft-gunnery training school. The

Navy and Air Force converted the rooms into regional headquarters for training anti-aircraft recruits.

After World War II, the facility was offered to the local community for $1. With Pacific Beach being unincorporated, the sale could not be completed. The base sat idle until 1950 when the Air Force moved in and used it as a radar station for five years.

Following years of inactivity, Naval Facility engineers redeveloped the base between 1957-1958. It was disestablished in October of 1987, transferred to Naval Station Puget Sound. It then was under the direction of Naval Station Everett. Under Commander Naval Station guidance, the facility is now an active part of Fleet & Family Readiness (MWR).

During 2000-2001, the hotel building underwent a complete renovation. The restaurant is open to the public. In 2010 a multi-million dollar renovation project was completed on the 30 cottages.

And when you drive Main Street, following the curve along the beach, you'll find the Pacific Beach Resort & Conference Center. You'll find the hotel, cottages, RV park/camping area, all with an expansive view of the Pacific Ocean.

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Author: Cindy Stearns – Editor
Blog #: 0710 – 11/11/19

Dining along the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway

By Cindy Stearns
Published: 11/04/19 Topics: Comments: -

You've decided to take a trip along the scenic Hidden Coast Scenic Byway. And you're going to dine as you go. Where and what are some of the selections you'll find?

As you head toward the beach, it's a stop at The Grizzly Den. Just before you reach the Bowerman Basin, it's this spot in Hoquiam. Order a hand-spanked burger with fresh, homemade fries. And plan on a milk shake or ice cream cone before you head on your way. You'll be able to eat inside, carry out or grab a picnic table. It's be known to spot a heron at the edge of the shorebird viewing area on your Hidden Coast trek.

Maybe you'd like to pick up something and fix yourself while you visit the beach. Lytle's Seafood is situated with a view of Grays Harbor. Lytle Seafoods Oyster Shack is a retail and wholesale seafood business. Specializing in their own fresh oysters grown in the cold waters of the North Bay of Grays Harbor, you're able to purchase and take with you on your journey. Other selections include a variety of seafood and more for you to enjoy.

Local markets dot your way along the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway. Sunrise Market is in Ocean City. New owner, Paula Parker continues to add new lines and products. Lonetree Espresso is a recent addition in the parking area. Grab an espresso on the go.

Copalis Beach Grocery is becoming a local and visitor favorite. This building was totally redone and is open every day of the year. Fresh produce and a bit of the gourmet selection is here for you.

Green Lantern Pub has been a traditional stop for bikers and the rest of us for years in Copalis Beach. During clam dig season, you'll find your clam guns available for sale on this corner. And it's now dining for all ages along with the bar.

Frontager's Pizza is a year-round treat in Seabrook. This concept company elevates the classic Italian brick-oven pizza by infusing Northwest artisanal ingredients. Next door is Sweet Life Ice Cream & Candy Shop featuring Olympic Mountain Ice Cream and tons of candy selections for you. New to Seabrook is a Food truck park and watch more additions and changes. (Watch for an announcement on Red Velvet Bakery.)

Speaking of pizza, there are a couple of more choices for you. Seagate Restaurant & Lounge on State Route 109 in Pacific Beach is known for their pizza. You may find homemade soup on the menu in winter and pan-fried oysters in season. There's a fully stocked bar and Karaoke on the weekends.

Take and bake (or let them do it) is at Moclips Country Deli and store right on SR 109. Also known for their burgers and you may find freshly made bake goods to purchase.

You & I Market in Pacific Beach has teriyaki fixed as you wait (or call ahead) six days a week. You may choose sweet & sour chicken or broccoli beef and other choices from the menu. It's ready for you in minutes.

Looking for a more formal, elegant experience? Ocean Crest Resort in Moclips is a four-generation run restaurant. Open breakfast through dinner, order Grandma's Clam Chowder, Salmon au Poivre with Maple-Balsamic Glazed Strawberries. Save room for dessert! And you may wish to start your day with Dungeness Crab Benedict.

Taholah Mercantile/Chitwin Cafe has Cooper Chicken, Skipper's and locally made soups and more for your lunch. Quinault Pride Seafood (just down the street) offers a retail stop. You're able to pick up individual or a gift-box of salmon and tuna to take with or ship. And fresh seafood (depends on the day and time of year) where you'll find halibut, sturgeon, tuna, seafood and more. Have them package it to take with you or ship it to yourself or as a gift.

Pick up s'mores supplies from any of the markets. Get that clamming license. It's all up to you with culinary choices to fit your style along the Hidden Coast Scenic Byway.

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Author: Cindy Stearns
Blog #: 0707 – 11/04/19

DETAILS: We work to keep this information up to date, but details do change from time to time based on circumstances, often on short notice, and sometimes beyond our control. To verify any answer or other information you may need, please call or email us anytime. Allow a reasonable amount of time for response. Only legitimate inquiries will be answered.